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Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

Dec 6, 2015 by

The Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly brings in a wide assortment of skulls for a visually stimulating discussion of what this set of bones is used for throughout the vertebrate kingdom. All studies of skeletons seem to inevitably center on the skull, as it is the most crucial area of anatomy. Nearly all vertebrates have most of their senses here, most vertebrates use their teeth to both catch and process their food and of course the brain is here. The skull is developed to many variations to do essentially the same jobs for all animals; bring the information from the senses close to the brain to facilitate speed in responding, catch, and if necessary kill the food animal and once in a while for defense, display or settling disputes.

Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly can be performed for any grade level from 3rd up. The information will be tailored to meet the level of the audience. However we generally cover the basic anatomy of the skull, with an explanation of structures; the uses the skull is put to in the context of the animal, and the behavioral effect on the animal of the development of its skull. Evolution will be discussed in this program, and cannot be removed. If this is unacceptable to you, please choose another program.

Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

Whales, like this Beluga, have unique skulls. Large auditory (hearing) areas, big brains and odd shapes when compared to their profiles due to the huge amounts of fat and oil they store in their heads.

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Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

Snake skulls are masterworks of evolution! They can split into separate sections that operate independently and their teeth are as efficient as fingers in pulling in their prey. Light and open, yet strong and maneuverable, the Reticulated Python is the pinnacle of constrictor evolution.

snake reptile Helicops erythrogrammus. (1842)

Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

The deer skull shows very typical adaptations to being a generalist herbivore, with incisor teeth from cutting and molars for chewing.

snake reptile Helicops abacurus. (1842)

Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

Any Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly where a discussion of of jaws takes place, would not be complete without the most famous “jaws” of them all, the shark. However since the shark has no bony skull it makes for an excellent contrast as well.

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Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

The Jaguar is the most powerful cat alive for it’s weight and it jaws are lethally powerful. these big cats can crush a tortoise shell or puncture a caimans hide as easily as you would eat a sub sandwich! Jags love to eat reptiles, and reptiles are generally very tough to to cut into…not for the Jags!

snake reptile Crotalus oregonus. (1842)

Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

Pandas are carnivores that some how altered their diet to live on plants material. How do we know? They still have meat cutting teeth and powerful jaws! Bamboo doesn’t run and can’t fight, but the Pandas are all set if they should!

snake reptile Crotalus durissus. (1842)

Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

For shear force and use of a blunt instrument, you can’t beat the alligator’s skull. Their jaw muscles create forces that no other creature can even approach and their skulls are hard and dense so that any animal they catch is unlikely to beat them back.

snake reptile Coluber vernalis. (1842)

Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

A cousin of our cows the Bison’s skull shows robust strength of jaws and teeth with a thick skull to take the blows of rival males.

snake reptile Coluber testaceus. (1842)

Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

The Smilodon or Saber Toothed Cat is one of the most extreme examples of skull specialization, as not only are the canine teeth of exaggerated size, the lower jaw extends significantly beyond the rage of any living cat. The reason behind these adaptations is still debated. Certainly they were used for taking prey, but how was that done? Unlike reptiles, these cats could not simply grow a new tooth if one was broken, and they would have broken if they collided with prey animals bones on a regular basis. So then where were these amazing weapons employed? And how did their development allow these cats to become the top predators of their world.

snake reptile Coluber quadrivittatus. (1842)

Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

Weak jawed, thin boned, with relatively poor hearing and slightly above average eye sight, the human skull holds perhaps the greatest mystery of evolution on Earth, our brain!

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Prices for Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

As an add-on program with any other program we offer

$150!

Alone

NORTH NJ (201,973,908,)                                                 $300
CENTRAL NJ & SI (732, 609, 856, 718 Excluding So NJ)             $300
SOUTH NY (845, 914, 516, 631)                                           $300
NYC (212, 718, 917, 646, 347)                                               $400
No. PA (Delaware Valley),                                                     $300
CT (203)                                                                     $300
PHILLY & SOUTH NJ (Atlantic, Cape May, Gloucester, Salem, Cumberland)      $300

To book Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

Call Bill at 973-248-9964

 

Skulls Horns and Teeth Science School Assembly

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